Already renowned as the best festival Britain has to offer, More Than The Music set out to bring you the highlights from around the Glastonbury site:

1)      Martha Tilston, Small World Stage (Sunday) – having missed Martha’s Union Chapel gig earlier this year her performance was already marked as one not to be overlooked. Nevertheless having filled her set with sincerity and verve, Martha quickly marked herself as the festival highlight. Describing the covered tent in which she played as ‘a hangover hug’ and delivering faultless harmonies with her backing band The Woods, Martha allowed those who had seen the highlights of Shangri-La to lie back and embrace her set. Including new songs Lucy and Wave Machine in amongst old favourites, the audience lapped up her politically flavoured Artificial and embraced her acoustic rendition of Good World, with even the most hungover joining in the chorus.

2)       Lissie, The Park (Friday) – Lissie might be a relative newbie in the public domain but her punchy pop is already racking her up support slots with the likes of City & Colour and Local Natives. Despite an early slot this didn’t stop Lissie giving the crowd her all, working her way through my personal favourite Cuckoo and instant hit Little Lovin’. Despite The Park sound guys being super tight on time, pulling the plug on the sound before Lissie had reached the end of her cover of Lady Gaga’s Bad Romance the audience seemed undeterred, finishing the song on her behalf.

3)      Imogen Heap, The Other Stage (Saturday) – having checked out Imogen’s track record it was with perplexity that she seemed to be given a space on the second largest stage of the site. Though her success in the States has been great, in the UK she’s yet to reach large mainstream success. Nevertheless her innovative use of instruments, including glasses and her wrist microphones, soon confirmed that Eavis had granted her a rightful place on the Other Stage. With highlights including Headlock and her MC style Earth from her latest album Ellipse, Imogen confirmed herself as deserving of more success.

4)      Laura Marling,  The Park (Saturday) – Having started out with Noah And The Whale, featuring as a backing vocalist on the debut album, Laura proved herself to be worthy of merit in her own right during her slot on the Saturday evening. Though she still comes across as somewhat nervous her new album material filled up the punch bowl effect of the Park Stage beautifully. Offering up a heartfelt rendition of Devil Spoke, as well as favourites from her first album, My Manic and I and Night Terror, the Park’s surrounding hills were filled with enthralled audience members. Like Imogen, Laura might fall out of the mainstream radar but she has solidified herself as one of the best (and potentially youngest) folk singers of 2010.

5)      First Aid Kit, Earth Dome (Friday) – First Aid Kit’s set was something of a lucky find. With no mention of the Earth Dome’s line up in the Glastonbury guide, had it not been for a meander through the Greenpeace field on Friday morning, they would have been missed totally. Having flown in from Sweden especially for the gig, their influence from the likes of Fleet Foxes is apparent. Nevertheless the duo provided a woozy acoustic set delighting onlookers with Tangerine and I Met Up With The King marking themselves as another band to watch in 2010.

6)      Broadcast 2000, BBC Introducing (Sunday) – whilst many ventured past the BBC introducing tent to watch the World Cup in the nearby field, it’s with delight that the inevitable defeat was missed in favour of Broadcast 2000’s set. Boasting poppy rhythms with a percussion section which is best witnessed live, it’s clear why they’re already being backed by the BBC. With both Rouse Your Bones and Don’t Weigh Me Down acting as solid representatives of their style, Broadcast 2000 are high on the list of bands to watch out for.

www.glastonburyfestivals.co.uk

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